CHUCK STEAK

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| Ingredients | How to cook beef chuck steak

How to cook beef chuck steak

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Don’t judge this one by its cover, chuck steak may be riddled with connective tissue, but when cooked over a longer period of time this tissue melts, producing an intense flavour.

The cut

A boneless cut taken from the first three ribs of the forequarter and extending up to the neck. A less tender open grained meat with minimal fat. A large working muscle with strong connective tissue means it is a cut best suited to slow cooking methods. It is one of the more economical cuts of beef. Many people may avoid buying it because of some visible fat - yet this is what makes the chuck steak so flavourful, ideal to cube for stews and curries.

How to cook

Best cooking methods – Slow cooking, Simmer

In the warmer social season, marinating the beef for several hours before cooking will not only help tenderise the steak, but provide a flavorsome base that can be used on the grill or skillet. Place the marinated steak on a hot plate and grill for 15-20 minutes or as per recipe instructions.

Alternatively, when using a skillet, it is important to ensure the beef does not stick to the pan, which may lead to piercing or prodding the steak. This will cause precious juices to escape resulting in a less moist, less tender result. When grilling or pan-frying, always allow the steak to rest for around 7 minutes after cooking to ensure the juices return to the centre of the steak for a more succulent result.

Given the tough trait of the chuck, using a slow cooker gives the most fork-tender result. Dice the steak and brown over medium-high heat before transferring to a slow cooker or casserole dish. Cover with a braising liquid suggested by the recipe and cook over several hours for a hearty, rich and flavorsome dish.

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Nutritional information

Summary:
  • Good source of Protein
  • Good source of Vitamin B12
  • Good source of Iron
  • Source of Zinc 
  • Low Sodium
Nutrient Composition:

Chuck Steak, Raw, Lean (per 100g)

  • Energy: 544kJ
  • Energy: 129kcal
  • Protein: 20.5g
  • Total Fat: 5.4g
  • Saturated Fat: 1.7g
  • Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.2g
  • Omega 3: 0.096g
  • Monounsaturated Fat: 2.0g
  • Cholesterol: 60.5mg
  • Sodium: 56mg
  • Iron: 4.8mg
  • Zinc: 2.0mg
  • Vitamin B12: 2.3ug
  • Vitamin D3: 0.15ug
  • 25-OH Vitamin D3: 0.22ug
  • Selenium: 1.3ug

Consider nutrition information of other ingredients added while cooking.

Source: The Concentration of Selected Nutrients in New Zealand Beef and Lamb Cuts and Offal Items, 2nd edition. Massey University, May 2013.